Holy Week Mass Schedule

good friday mass schedule burnaby bc ca parish
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Schedule for Holy Week March 24th to April 1st, 2018

DayEvents
Saturday, March 24th5:00 PM : Palm Sunday Mass
Sunday, March 25th9:00 AM : Palm Sunday Mass
11:00 AM : Palm Sunday Mass
Thursday, March 29th(No Morning Mass)
Holy Thursday
7.00 PM : Mass of the Lord’s Supper,
Washing of the feet


8:00 PM -12:00 AM : Adoration
March 30th
(Fast & Abstinence)
(No Morning Mass)
1:00 pm : Station of the Cross
3:00 PM : Good Friday Mass
(Passion of Our Lord)
      + Followed by :
        Divine Mercy Novena
Saturday, March 31st(No Morning Mass)

Holy Saturday Mass:

8:00 PM : Divine Mercy Novena
9.00 PM : Easter Vigil
(Attending this service
would fulfill your
Sunday obligation)
April 1stEaster Sunday

9:00 AM : Easter Mass I
      + Followed by :
        Divine Mercy Novena

11:00 AM : Easter Mass II


FRIDAY SCHEDULE DURING LENTEN SEASON :

TimeFriday Schedule
9:00 amMorning Mass followed by Adoration
3:00 pmChaplet of Divine Mercy
6:00 pmBenediction
6:30 pmStations of the Cross
7:00 pmEvening Mass
7:30 pmLenten Talk

Abstinence, Easter Sunday, Easter Vigil , Eucharistic Mass, Fast, Good Friday Mass, Holy Mass, Holy Mass I, Holy Mass II, Holy Saturday Mass, Holy Thursday, Morning Mass, Novena, Palm Sunday Mass, Passion of Our Lord, Rosary, Special mass , Stations of The Cross, Sunday obligation, the last supper, Washing of the feet

HOLY THURSDAY is the most complex and profound of all religious observances, saving only the Easter Vigil. It celebrates both the institution by Christ himself of the Eucharist and of the institution of the sacerdotal priesthood (as distinct from the ‘priesthood of all believers’) for in this, His last supper with the disciples, a celebration of Passover, He is the self-offered Passover Victim, and every ordained priest to this day presents this same sacrifice, by Christ’s authority and command, in exactly the same way. The Last Supper was also Christ’s farewell to His assembled disciples, some of whom would betray, desert or deny Him before the sun rose again.
On Holy Thursday there is a special Mass in Cathedral Churches, attended by as many priests of the diocese as can attend, because it is a solemn observance of Christ’s institution of the priesthood. At this ‘Chrism Mass’ the bishop blesses the Oil of Chrism used for Baptism and Confirmation. The bishop may wash the feet of twelve of the priests, to symbolize Christ’s washing the feet of his Apostles, the first priests.
The Holy Thursday liturgy, celebrated in the evening because Passover began at sundown, also shows both the worth God ascribes to the humility of service, and the need for cleansing with water (a symbol of baptism) in the Mandatum, or washing in Jesus’ washing the feet of His disciples, and in the priest’s stripping and washing of the altar. Cleansing, in fact, gave this day of Holy Week the name Maundy Thursday.
The action of the Church on this night also witnesses to the Church’s esteem for Christ’s Body present in the consecrated Host in the Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament, carried in solemn procession to the flower-bedecked Altar of Repose, where it will remain ‘entombed’ until the communion service on Good Friday. No Mass will be celebrated again in the Church until the Easter Vigil proclaims the Resurrection.
And finally, there is the Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament by the people during the night, just as the disciples stayed with the Lord during His agony on the Mount of Olives before the betrayal by Judas.
Maundy Thursday (also known as Holy Thursday, Covenant Thursday, Great and Holy Thursday, Sheer Thursday and Thursday of Mysteries) is the Christian holy day, falling on the Thursday before Easter. It commemorates the Maundy and Last Supper of Jesus Christ with the Apostles as described in the Canonical gospels. It is the fifth day of Holy Week, and is preceded by Holy Wednesday and followed by Good Friday.
The date is always between 19 March and 22 April inclusive, but these dates fall on different days depending on whether the Gregorian or Julian calendar is used liturgically. Eastern churches generally use the Julian calendar, and so celebrate this feast throughout the 21st century between 1 April and 5 May in the more commonly used Gregorian calendar. The liturgy held on the evening of Maundy Thursday initiates the Easter Triduum, the period which commemorates the passion, death, and resurrection of Christ; this period includes Good Friday, Holy Saturday, and ends on the evening of Easter. The Mass or service of worship is normally celebrated in the evening, when Friday begins according to Jewish tradition, as the Last Supper was held on feast of Passover.
Good Friday is a Christian religious holiday commemorating the crucifixion of Jesus Christ and his death at Calvary. The holiday is observed during Holy Week as part of the Paschal Triduum on the Friday preceding Easter Sunday, and may coincide with the Jewish observance of Passover. It is also known as Holy Friday, Great Friday, Black Friday, or Easter Friday, though the last term properly refers to the Friday in Easter week.
Based on the details of the canonical gospels, the Crucifixion of Jesus was most likely to have been on a Friday (the day before the Jewish Sabbath) (John 19:42). The estimated year of the Crucifixion is AD 33, by two different groups, and originally as AD 34 by Isaac Newton via the differences between the Biblical and Julian calendars and the crescent of the moon. A third method, using a completely different astronomical approach based on a lunar Crucifixion darkness and eclipse model (consistent with Apostle Peter’s reference to a “moon of blood” in Acts 2:20), points to Friday, 3 April AD 33.
Good Friday is a widely-instituted legal holiday in many national governments around the world, including in most Western countries (especially among Catholic nations and majority-Catholic countries) as well as in 12 U.S. states. Some governments have laws prohibiting certain acts that are seen as profaning the solemn nature of the day.